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4 Essentials for Travellers to Japan!

Travel Tips

1.Travel Plan

1.Travel Plan

Plan Your Trip!
How long does it take to get to a stadium or restaurant? What trains do I need to take? There can be a lot of worry in traveling. But send that worry packing with the plus marks located next to areas and facility names—these save the destinations just like putting items in an online shopping cart. Once you save your desired locations, click TRAVEL PLAN, and the recommended route will automatically be generated for you.
You can create your own sightseeing course by connecting sightseeing spots that you have favorited.
Click 'ADD MY PLAN' button or plus button to favorite a spot.
and then Please go to Japan Trip Planner. Japan Trip Planner displays sightseeing spots that you have favorited on a map. Click a spot and select 'Add to course' to create your own sightseeing course!

Person Name

Useful tool to travel around the country, especially when you do not understand the languages nor familiar with transportation system. This tool will help you find the most efficient and convenient ways to go around the places!

Kevin Jackson

2.Japan Rail Pass

2.Japan Rail Pass

The Japan Rail Pass is a cost-effective feature that gives you unlimited use of JR trains for one, two or three weeks. The pass is available in two varieties—Ordinary and Green. The latter allows you to sit in first class seats. The Japan Rail Pass can be purchased outside of Japan, so make sure to get it before you leave for your trip! It’s a bargain for tourists!

Person Name

If you're a tourist in Japan, you should definitely get a Japan Rail Pass! I used one on my first trip to Japan, and it made traveling around so easy and inexpensive.

Alec Jordan

Person Name

I used the Japan Rail Pass several times as a tourist coming from France during summer vacations and visiting friends from Tokyo to Fukuoka. I always appreciated the freedom of jumping on a Shinkansen any time of day, finding a seat, and enjoying the comfort of the train. And for the student I was then, it was great to save so much!

Denis Sigal

3.Wi-Fi

3.Wi-Fi

Having Wi-Fi in Japan is pretty useful. Japan Wireless is a company that provides rental pocket wi-fi devices that deliver high-speed internet at affordable rates. Book before you leave for Japan, as they send the pocket device to you before your trip. You pay to use it for as long as you like, and then just send it back in the provided return envelope after your stay!

Person Name

A great service that keeps you connected even when exploring Japan’s more rural areas!

Leon van Houwelingen

4.ATM

4.ATM

In Japan people tend to use cash for most transactions. So at some point you will likely need to withdraw money. Most ATMs in Japan only allow you to withdraw cash if the card you are using was issued in Japan. Exceptions are postal ATMs, found mainly at post offices, and Seven Bank ATMs, at some 20,000 7-Eleven convenience stores. Seven Bank ATMs are available 24 hours a day, all year.

Person Name

Before I got my Japanese bank account, I always knew where to go when I needed to withdraw cash: 7-Eleven! With other ATMs, I was never sure whether they would accept an international card, but 7-Eleven ATMs always had me covered.

Alec Jordan

Person Name

This one should not be underestimated. Cash is everything in Japan—do not rely on a credit card to get you through as it may not be accepted at restaurants, shops, or ATMs. The trusty 7-Eleven has never let me down though!

Garreth Stevens

Person Name

Availability of ATMs in Japan is amazing! You can find one at every corner. I remember being in need of some cash while out drinking around midnight in Tokyo, stepping into a convenience store, and immediately withdrawing money to continue enjoying the night!

Denis Sigal